How To Tune Your Guitar With Natural Harmonics

How To Tune Your Guitar With Natural Harmonics

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How To Tune Your Guitar With Natural Harmonics
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How to tune your guitar with natural harmonics Beginner acoustic and electric
guitar tuning the best way to tune your guitar

10 responses to “How To Tune Your Guitar With Natural Harmonics”

  1. gitariff says:

    damb that is the stupedest looking guitar i have ever seen but
    Jennifer is so hot

  2. Tommy Phung says:

    really I don’t know which one is better that vintage guitar or the guitarist

  3. MetalSir says:

    cool! =)

    MetalSir

  4. Dan Kingsley says:

    is that a charvel?

  5. daniel lewis says:

    Awesome guitar, rock and roll baby.

  6. MrOzgooner says:

    Did Jennifer rout the charvel guitar to fit a humbucker? 

  7. Alexander Pace says:

    This is incorrect. The guitar is tuned to 12 tone equal temperament. The harmonic series of a single string will be in Just Intonation, a completely different tuning system. Each fret of the guitar is 1/12 of a pythagorean comma sharp of Just Intonation. The compound error by the time you reach the high e is significant enough to notice as out of tune. This is a bad method it will condition your ear to think you are playing in tune when your guitar is actually out.

  8. Joe Anderson says:

    Sorry to tell you, but this method of tuning is not accurate for one simple reason:
    The frequency of the harmonic at any 7th fret does not exactly correspond to the frequency of any fretted note on the guitar. Consequently, tuning by this method will result in you being out of tune 🙁
    I learned this many years ago right out of a physic book working as an engineer at Hughes Aircraft (Fullerton CA).

  9. Scott Lyle says:

    This is an inaccurate method of tuning. The dilemma is that it “appears” to be accurate. The problem is in the math and the ratios of the partials that one is tuning to. The 5th fret produces a pitch at .25 the length of the string which of course manufactures a harmonic two octaves higher than the open string. The 7th fret however produces a pitch at .33333_ (etc…= an “irrational ratio”!). The seventh fret is a 3:2 ratio of the open string and therefore produces a pitch one octave and a perfect fifth higher than open. Perfect 5ths are not in tune with an equal temperament tuning system. If one uses a rational ratio (.25 for instance) to tune to an irrational one (.3333_), problems will result – and I’ve witnessed this live very frequently! What’s worse is that as one keeps tuning successive strings, the problem proportionately grows worse. There is a better method that incorporates Equal Temperament, Mean Tone, and Pythagorean tuning methods that has been taught for centuries. I will try to upload a version at my earliest convenience.

  10. kenneth hasel says:

    sweet axe!! I have a Charvel Fusion Deluxe !!!

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